My Endo180
Cancer Blog

Dr Justin Sturge


My Life In Science

I work at the University of Hull where I am Director of the Endo180 Cancer Team winner of the Educate North Research Team Of The Year award in 2016.
Before moving to Yorkshire I lived and worked in London.
I spent three years working as a graduate research assistant at King's College London from 1992 to 1995. I then moved to Imperial College London where I was awarded my Ph.D. in 1998. My first post-doctoral work was conducted with Professor Gareth Jones at King's College London from 1998 to 2001. My next five years of post-doctoral research was conducted with Professor Clare Isacke at the Institute of Cancer Research.
My first academic appointment was as Non-Clinical Lecturer with Professor Jonathan Waxman in the Faculty of Medicine at Imperial College London from 2006 to 2011. I was Senior Lecturer in The School of Biological, Biomedical & Environmental Sciences at the University of Hull from 2012 - 2016 and appointed Reader in 2016.
My research since 2001 has focused on understanding how the receptor Endo180 contributes to the different stages of cancer, and I am now using the latest technologies available to translate this knowledge into better survival rates for patients.

Endo180 - A Monster Molecule

Endo180 plays fundamental roles in the pathology of breast cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, glioblastoma, osteosarcoma and secondary bone cancer. More cancer types are likely to be added to this list as research progresses.

New cancer diagnostics and therapeutics are currently under development in my laboratory. These are based on our discovery that Endo180 is part of a molecular switch for aggressive cancer. This breakthrough was reported in Molecular Cancer Research a journal published by the American Association for Cancer Research in March 2015.
This Blog will keep you updated on all of the Endo180 related research being conducted throughout the world, as it translates from the laboratory bench to the bedsides of cancer patients.